Different Therapy Approaches May Help Different Personality Types

For those battling depression, both cognitive-behavioral therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy have long been recognized as very effective means of overcoming depression. A new study printed in the British Journal of Psychiatry and published on PsychiatryOnline.org shows that differing personality traits can affect how responsive people are to these two main types of therapy. The researchers wanted to know if certain personality traits made treatment less effective. Their conclusion: the success of interpersonal therapy seemed to vary based on the individual’s personality and temperament, while the success of cognitive-behavioral therapy showed no difference based on personality traits. This can help therapists further match clients with the best form of treatment not only for their struggles (e.g. depression), but their personality as well.

© Copyright 2010 by By John Smith, therapist in Bellingham, Washington. All Rights Reserved. Permission to publish granted to GoodTherapy.org.

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  • Erin Ashley

    Erin Ashley

    June 22nd, 2010 at 4:32 PM

    I agree that no single therapy approach will work for everybody but it is all about the human psyche and it differs from person to person which in turn is determined by a whole lot of factors…

  • minako

    minako

    June 22nd, 2010 at 4:34 PM

    surely this recognition will lead to much better therapy choices between doctors and patients

  • phoebe

    phoebe

    September 24th, 2018 at 1:53 AM

    What is the name and the researchers of the study the author is talking about?

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