The Worst Social Media Site for Mental Health, and Other News

Sad woman looking at phoneAccording to a report by the Royal Society for Public Health, social media app Instagram is more harmful to young people’s mental health than other social media platforms. The report, which stems from a survey of nearly 1,500 teens and young adults, linked Instagram to bullying, anxiety, depression, and fear of missing out.

The report did not, however, find that social media use is universally bad for mental health. Social media sites were linked to self-expression, a sense of community, a sense of identity, and greater social support. Some sites offered other benefits. YouTube, for example, promoted awareness of others’ experiences, decreased depression and loneliness, and offered access to reliable health information.

The report suggests social media platforms can protect users’ mental health by:

  • Adding pop-up warnings pointing to the risks of heavy use.
  • Providing methods to identify and support users who experience mental health issues.
  • Offering notifications to alert when a photo has been digitally altered.

We Need More Studies on Kids’ Mental Health

Opinion pieces that raise alarm bells about psychological screening in schools often neglect a vital piece of the puzzle: we know little about children’s mental health, and many childhood mental health issues go undetected. Routine mental health screenings could change this, offering better services to children with mental health concerns.

Number of University Dropouts Due to Mental Health Problems Trebles

The number of students leaving universities in the United Kingdom due to mental health issues has increased threefold in recent years. More students are requesting counseling, as schools struggle to keep up with their mental health needs.

Walgreen’s Mental Health Initiative Expands Reach

With about 1 in 5 Americans experiencing a mental health condition, mental health concerns are more prevalent than physical health issues. The Walgreens Boots Alliance, now in its second year, expanded mental health access and screenings in an attempt to provide more treatment and more resources. The retailer, which partnered with Mental Health America for the service, says 75% of people who completed mental health screenings are taking steps toward follow-up care.

How Does My Social Circle Affect My Depression Risk?

Loved ones can be both a cause of depression and a support system for fighting depression. Some relationships provide relief and social support. Others are a source of depression-triggering stress. Some are both. Experts say the key is to recognize and cultivate healthy relationships with others.

The Climate Crisis May Be Taking a Toll On Your Mental Health

Ecoanxiety, the fear of an impending environmental crisis, is increasingly common. A new report from the American Psychological Association (APA) suggests this anxiety may directly affect relationships and functioning. For instance, every standard deviation of rainfall and temperature increase is expected to produce a 4% increase in interpersonal conflict.

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  • celeste

    celeste

    May 26th, 2017 at 10:40 AM

    Instagram encourages no secrets
    everyone knows what everyone is up to
    even when it would be best for some people to be left in the dark
    they wind up feeling pretty terrible about the things that they could be missing out on

  • Candi

    Candi

    May 27th, 2017 at 7:30 AM

    Going off to school can be a big adjustment for so many students. It doesn’t surprise me at all to learn that many of them experience mental health challenges once they are away from home.

    As long as the schools do a good job addressing these issues then I don’t have a problem because it is actually possible that they will have more accessibility to care in a campus setting than they would in any old small town venue.
    The biggest issue is do they know that help is there and will they have friends there who are encouraging them to get help if they see that this is going to be needed?

  • emanuel

    emanuel

    May 28th, 2017 at 12:53 PM

    Sure I am concerned about the environment and climate change and what a mess we have made collectively to this planet of ours. But at this point what more can we do other than hope to God that other people get on board with us and stop some of this madness that we are creating? I am not, cannot, sit around and worry about things that are huge like this that are so far beyond my control. Times are scary, but I have to enjoy the moment, do my part, and hope for the best. Mainly that everyone else will soon come to their senses as well!

  • Jazz

    Jazz

    May 29th, 2017 at 8:19 AM

    When I used to drink pretty heavily I found that the people that I was hanging out with were the ones who would either influence me to drink even more or I would be with the group of people who believed that you could have a good time doing anything and it didn’t have to involve drinking.

    Needless to say when I wanted to drink and let loose you know the people that I would choose to do that with!

    But then my whole life started feeling much too toxic and I found that in order to get clean and get sober, I had to be willing to purge some of these people from my life because they were only feeding into those negative behavior patterns that I was actually wanting to break free of.

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