Maggie O'Connor, MA, LMFT

Maggie O'Connor, MA, LMFT

Professions: Psychotherapy, Marriage & Family Therapy
License Status: I'm a licensed professional.
Primary Credential: Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist - 000249
Secondary Credential: Marriage and Family Therapist - 41856
Verified Credentials
1-800-651-8085 ext. 21759
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Office 1
14 Harwood Court, Suite 321
Scarsdale, New York 10583 - United States
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When your relationships aren't working, everything else seems that much harder; it's tough to know what to do. You've tried everything, but feel like you're getting nowhere - like you are losing ground.

You might feel:
* Misunderstood
* Confused
* Frustrated
* Irritable
* Overwhelmed

That same argument keeps coming up, though you though you'd 'solved' it many times before.

You get that nagging feeling like something else is going on, but can't put your finger on it.
You may even get the sinking feeling that you've been in this relationship before - but with a different person.

You ask yourself, 'How did this happen, again?!'

It makes sense that your energy for this is waning -
It's exhausting when you are so good at coming up with solutions in other parts of your life; but in your most important relationships, those same strategies fall short.

You don't have to live like this forever.

Together, we will create a new understanding about what's really happening within you, and in your relationships, and learn to communicate on that level, every single day. Together, we will create a roadmap to lasting change, that reaches into all aspects of your life!

Email or Call Maggie O'Connor, MA, LMFT at 1-800-651-8085 ext. 21759

What I Love about Being a Psychotherapist

This is so much more than just work that I love - it is a calling.

It is incredibly rewarding to be with you in your 'aha' moments, in which you discover something that largely explains the mystery of why you do what you do. I'm honored to be with you as you see the potential to create different ways of being that make your life more satisfying.

Coming from a place of compassion, I am so very curious about you. There is no space for judgment in the therapy room. You have very good reasons for doing what you do - you make complete sense, and once we get those underlying meanings, it's like a light breaks through.

Even when it's been a tough session, we've likely gotten somewhere you couldn't have before.

I am constantly amazed by your capacity for change; and I am honored to support you on this road.

What I Say to People Concerned about the Therapy Process

When you have a big, beautiful house, you need to do maintenance work to keep it that way. You call plumbers, electricians, and landscapers to help you keep that structure, a place you want to live.

Sometimes you decide you've outgrown a space and call a contractor. You overhaul a room, or an entire area of that beautiful home.

And sometimes, despite your best efforts, the pipes burst; the basement floods; the foundation is compromised. And you find yourself desperately on the phone with all kinds of professionals you never knew existed.

This is similar to how therapy can work.

Sometimes you seek a therapist because there is a crisis, like the flooded basement. Maybe life got so crazy, you lost track and didn't maintain what worked in your life; and it broke down. This is a great time to get support immediately, before you lose more ground.

On the other hand, sometimes you come in because you're stuck in a rut, or because you're just not feeling balanced, and your regular outlets aren't helping enough. Maybe it's time for an overhaul, like when you re-do your kitchen.

Maybe you just need some tweaking of some of the things that still work. A little paint, a little oil -

It makes sense to call a professional when your best efforts aren't producing the results you'd like to see; it's the smart thing to do.

The Duration and Frequency of Therapy

For most people, weekly sessions make the most sense, so the discussion stays fresh, and we keep up the energy for the work. The length of a therapy session is usually 50 minutes, and the reason for that is that it seems to be about as long as you can keep your attention and energy on one thing, without a break.

Because of the interpersonal nature of couples work, the best results come from weekly 75-minute sessions; that gives us enough time for a little more than a full hour of actual process with time at both ends to transition in and out of the therapeutic space.

Video Message


Please note: The video above was submitted by Maggie O'Connor, MA, LMFT, and any views or opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org. We do our best to ensure videos align with our mission and vision; however, if you find there is inappropriate content, please email us or call 888-563-2112 ext. 2.

Services I Provide

  • Individual Therapy & Counseling
  • Marriage, Couples, or Relationship Counseling
  • Consultation
  • Online Counseling / Phone Therapy

Ages I Work With

  • Teens
  • Adults

Languages

  • English

Client Concerns Within Your Scope of Practice

  • Anxiety
  • Attachment Issues
  • Codependency / Dependency
  • Communication Problems
  • Depression
  • Divorce / Divorce Adjustment
  • Infidelity / Affair Recovery
  • LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) Issues
  • Pre-Marital Counseling
  • Relationships and Marriage
  • Shame
  • Stress
  • Trust Issues
  • Worry

Types of Therapy

  • Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy
  • Emotionally Focused Therapy
  • Family Systems Therapy
  • Imago Relationship Therapy
  • Integration of different therapy models
  • Internal Family Systems
  • Mindfulness Based Interventions
  • Relationship Enhancement Therapy
  • Systems Theory /Therapy

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