Find the Best Therapy for Depression in Seattle, WA

Find Therapy for Depression in Seattle, WA

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It is normal to face mental health issues or personal conflict in your life, and talking to a licensed therapist about these challenges can be helpful. Therapy can teach you more about yourself and the root causes of your mental health concerns in a healing way. The GoodTherapy.org team works to provide options for ethical, professional, and compassionate counselors and therapists near you. The therapists listed above, who have met our high membership standards, conduct therapy in Seattle.

The process of finding a therapist can be overwhelming, but GoodTherapy.org can help you set up a therapy session without added stress. With our online directory, the right therapist is easy to find. Therapists in Seattle are listed in our online directory, so you can now find a counselor with or without speaking on the phone. We have been helping people like you connect with therapists since 2007. Today, we strive to help you find therapists in Seattle who can treat your specific concerns.

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Symptoms of depression affect millions of people across the United States each year, which makes it a common mental health issue and reason why people try to find a therapist in Seattle. While the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) clearly identifies several distinctive types of depression - such as postpartum depression, depression related to bipolar issues, and clinical depression (also referred to as major depression)- there are a few depression symptoms that are usually observed in people experiencing the condition. Some common signs of depression may include:

  • Persistent low mood
  • Low feelings self-worth
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Aches and pains that do not subside with treatment
  • Strong feelings of guilt
  • Low energy levels
  • Reduced interest in hobbies or social activities a person once enjoyed
  • Restlessness
  • Feeling on edge
  • Impaired decision-making
  • Reduced concentration
  • Persistent thoughts of suicide
  • Attempts to die by suicide

Though many people with major depression, postpartum depression, or other depressive conditions may experience a variety of symptoms, it is important to note that affected individuals may not experience all symptoms of depression. Nevertheless, if low mood and several other depression symptoms are persistent, therapists in Seattle may diagnose a depressive condition.

While the exact causes of depression may vary, there are several contributing factors that may be treated by licensed therapists. In Seattle, therapists may look at factors such as depression within the family, trauma, extreme stress, serious illness, major life changes, and other environmental, biological, or psychological issues that may put some individuals at increased risk for developing the condition.

The National Institute of Mental Health asserts that men and women of all ages, ethnicities, and socioeconomic backgrounds may experience depression. Treatment for the condition may involve various forms of talk therapy, the administration of antidepressant medication, or a combination of both therapeutic approaches.

References:

  1. Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (n.d.). DSM-5: Changes to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. Retrieved from http://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/DSM-5-changes
  2. National Institute of Mental Health. (2016). Depression. Retrieved from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml