1 in 5 College Women Sexually Assaulted, and Other News

Young woman leaning against a tree with head in handsOne in five college women have experienced some form of sexual assault, a survey of 150,000 undergraduates has found. Eleven percent of respondents reported experiencing a rape or attempted rape. Five percent of men reported experiencing some form of sexual assault. The survey—conducted by the American Association of Universities—involved 27 schools, including most of the Ivy League.

Two schools—the California Institute of Technology and Texas A&M University—had lower-than-average rates of sexual assault at 13% and 15% respectively. The majority (15 schools) had sexual assault rates ranging from 19-24%. Ten schools had high rates, ranging from 25-30%. The University of Michigan and University of Southern California had the highest overall rates at 30%.

Rape remains among the most underreported crimes. According to the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)—the nation’s largest sexual assault advocacy and prevention organization—just 32 out of every 100 rapes are reported to police. Only 2 out of every 100 people accused of rape serve time in jail.

The survey may shed some light on this phenomenon. Only 25% of respondents reported their rape or attempted rape to authorities, with many believing the assault did not seem serious enough to report. Just 56% of respondents said they believed authorities at their school would protect students who reported sexual misconduct.

The Secret to Being a Convincing Liar? Tell Your Fibs on a Full Bladder

Researchers at California State University have discovered that a full bladder might make you a better liar. The phenomenon is due to the “inhibitory spillover effect.” When people need to empty their bladders, they are forced to exercise self-control, and this same self-control can help them more effectively tell a lie.

ERs Often ‘Safety Net’ Care for People with Schizophrenia: CDC

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests people with schizophrenia often rely on emergency rooms during mental health crises. Between 2009 and 2011, emergency rooms recorded 382,000 visits from people with schizophrenia. Many of these visits came from people who were homeless and on Medicaid. People with schizophrenia may find it difficult to afford and access mental health care and may not have the resources to advocate for themselves or seek out high-quality care.

Gene May Amplify Impact of Life Events on Mental Health

A study of 333 middle-aged Australians has uncovered a gene that may alter reactions to life events. Most genes interact with the environment and may be turned on or off by the right environmental stimuli. When people possess a gene called SERT in a variation known as s/s, they may react more poorly to traumatic life events, dealing with more mental health issues. When not exposed to traumatic life events, though, these same people show higher-than-average levels of happiness and good mental health.

Suicide Declines With Prevention Measures at Known ‘Hotspots’: Study

Since its opening in 1937, more than 1,700 people have fallen to their deaths from atop the Golden Gate Bridge. Japan’s Aokigahara forest is the world’s second most popular suicide site, with between 10 and 30 people killing themselves in the forest each year for a total of at least 500 deaths since the 1950s. A new analysis of 18 studies suggests taking preventive actions at so-called suicide “hotspots” could reduce the suicide rate. Such methods include signs encouraging people to seek help, increased video surveillance, and safety nets and barriers designed to block the means of suicide.

Combined with other measures, methods that restrict access produced 91% fewer suicides per year and 93% fewer suicides when used alone. Encouraging people to seek help reduced suicide by 51% when used with other methods and by 61% when used alone.

How Different Are Your Online and Offline Personalities?

As social media has become increasingly integrated into our lives, maintaining anonymity online has become difficult. The average United Kingdom adult spends about 20 hours a week online. Similar hours have been reported for the United States, with about 30% of that time spent on social media. Data from web searches, social media posts, and other Internet usage trends can often reveal a lot about a person’s personality—even when his or her social media or Internet presence is not a complete representation of who he or she is.

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  • Noelle

    Noelle

    September 25th, 2015 at 1:01 PM

    Those kind of sexual assault numbers are much too high
    and this is an issue that has to be dealt with immediately
    these are the best and brightest young girls that our country has to offer’
    and we continue to allow them to be mistreated like this

  • Ronni

    Ronni

    September 26th, 2015 at 10:53 AM

    How are you really supposed to get to know someone if they project something totally different online than they are in reality?

  • chuck

    chuck

    September 27th, 2015 at 7:40 AM

    I think that it is wonderful that so many suicide hotspots have been identified and that more and more efforts are being made to stop the numbers of suicide to climb. I think that this is probably one of the most terrible things for any family to have to endure and it pains me to think of how much this person who chose this route must have been hurting, what they were feeling to make them come to the fact that this was the only option left for them.

  • Kelley

    Kelley

    September 28th, 2015 at 10:18 AM

    Strange how two things that seemingly have nothing in common like a full bladder and the ability to tell an effective lie actually can be related.
    Remind me to always make my kids go to the bathroom before interrogating them about anything.

  • Michelle

    Michelle

    September 28th, 2015 at 5:17 PM

    I was raped as a college undergrad and I was devastated too much to report it.

    I now regret that I didn’t because I think that my life could have been completely different had I been able to stand up for myself and fight for myself.

  • coley

    coley

    September 29th, 2015 at 10:35 AM

    So would you think that people would want to know if they have this specific gene that could cause them to react differently than others do in any given traumatic situation? I am not sure that I would want to know because it sort of feels like this would just set me up to react in a certain way because I would know that I was predisposed to do so.

  • Hank

    Hank

    September 29th, 2015 at 10:45 AM

    Not every single place that someone could kill themselves could be labeled as a hot spot and there are many who would even shun this kind of place for their final act because to them it could seem cliche.
    I do not mean to make light of this and I DO hope that these things help but it still has to be about more outreach and education, get these people help before they would even think to get to this place to end their lives.

  • rory

    rory

    September 30th, 2015 at 12:08 PM

    I find that it is very common for people to create something that they are not in their online profile. They are able to be whatever they want to be and who they want to be without any real ramifications. They can spin lies all they want and it never really matters until they have to meet someone in the flesh. And even then they can continue to pull one over on you unless you are pretty careful.

  • chase

    chase

    September 30th, 2015 at 3:37 PM

    how do we know that the high rape numbers at those two schools are not artificially inflated or that they are not conversely under reported at other schools?

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