Find the Best Family Counseling in Denver, CO

Find Family Counseling in Denver, CO

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It’s normal to experience mental health issues and relationship problems. Talking to a licensed therapist can help. Therapy can teach you more about yourself and your mental health concerns in a healing way. Many therapies are evidence-based and have been proven effective.

Since 2007, GoodTherapy has helped people like you connect with ethical, compassionate counselors and therapists. The therapists listed above, who practice therapy in Denver, are trained to protect client confidentiality and privacy. In keeping with our high membership standards, these mental health professionals are also committed to eliminating the stigma that keeps many people from seeking help.

Beliefs about how much therapy costs may deter some people from finding a therapist. It’s a good idea to contact therapists you’re interested in and ask about insurance, sliding-scale fees, payment plans, and other options to stay within your budget.

Rest assured there are qualified therapists in Denver who can treat a variety of concerns, including family conflict, relationship issues, anxiety, or depression. With our directory, the right therapist is easy to find.

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Are you a therapist or mental health professional looking for new ways to get referrals and market your practice in Denver? Keeping up to date with professional requirements and increasing your online presence are just two of the many benefits of joining GoodTherapy. Start connecting with clients and earning online continuing education credits today!.

Family therapy and "family education" are concepts often mentioned in the mental health care industry. While some people may think of both terms as interchangeable, they do not refer to exactly the same thing.

Family education refers to informational sessions that are often provided by a behavioral health program to family members of a person in treatment. For example, if a person is experiencing substance dependence issues, the clinicians may offer them individual treatment, while also providing educational sessions for other members of the family. Family education helps family members get a clearer idea of what issues the person in therapy is facing, how these issues may affect them, and how they may provide necessary support during and after the therapeutic process.

Family therapy, on the other hand, goes a bit deeper than family education. Though education is an important part of treatment and recovery, family counseling services help family members to make practical application of the things they have learned. A trained family counselor is able to focus on the health of the entire family unit and provide a safe environment where emotional issues and conflicts may be unearthed and addressed. Even young family members may benefit as a variety of family therapy techniques and creative family therapy activities are utilized by the family therapist. In Denver, family therapists help family members examine how they interact with each other and develop useful problem-solving and communication skills in order to improve future interactions.

Family counseling services may only be provided by a qualified family therapist. In Denver and other cities across the United States, a family counselor must meet the legal and professional requirements for practicing family therapy. Interventions employed during family therapy require skilled direction in order to be beneficial.

References:

  1. Mayo Clinic. (2014). Family therapy. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/family-therapy/basics/definition/prc-20014423
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2013). Family therapy can help. Retrieved from https://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA13-4784/SMA13-4784.pdf