5 Ways You Can Support Mental Health Awareness Month 2017

Illustration of person on bench and text "Not all wounds are visible. Walk gently in the lives of others."Throughout the month of May, GoodTherapy.org is excited to participate in Mental Health Awareness Month (referred to in some circles as Mental Health Month) for the 10th time since the company was founded in 2007. In that time, we’ve seen steps forward and backward as policies and conversations have shifted along with access to mental health care. Even as some strides have been made to promote ethical mental health treatment and reduce stigma—two of the most important aspects of our mission and vision—there remains much work to be done.

A drug overdose epidemic, for example, is causing more deaths annually than car crashes in the United States. This trend is quickly turning into a generational struggle as more than 50,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2015—the most such fatalities in a year in American history. Numerous disparities in mental health among minority populations must be addressed. African-American adults, for example, are still 20% more likely to report serious psychological distress than their white counterparts, yet they are less likely to receive or have access to treatment for common mental health issues such as depression. Additionally, too many old myths about psychotherapy and mental health issues continue to persist and hinder needed change and access to treatment. Simply put, there are many areas in which we can do better, locally and globally.

Mental Health America launched Mental Health Awareness Month in 1949 to increase awareness of mental health issues, reduce stigma, and share resources to help people cope, live a higher quality of life, and heal emotional and psychological wounds. We believe the more than 2 million monthly visitors to GoodTherapy.org and the more than 350,000 people engaging with us on our social media channels are some of the most powerful agents of change as the month ahead unfolds. We humbly ask you to tune in and look for ways to increase your own understanding, challenge stigma, and help us support mental health awareness in the following ways:

Know How to Help Someone in a Crisis

About 1 in 5 people will experience a mental health issue in their lifetime. These are our friends, family members, and loved ones who may be experiencing symptoms of mental health issues that aren’t obvious or visible. Keep resources on hand, learn how to recognize the signs, and know where you would go for help if someone you care about were to experience a crisis. Here are a few resources we’ve developed you can keep on hand:

Share Your Experiences

Whether it’s a story about treatment or how your life is impacted by a mental health issue, sharing your experiences can be powerful for you and others. During Mental Health Awareness Month, we encourage readers to consider sharing their stories with us (click the corresponding link below for more info), sharing with someone they trust, or sharing with a licensed therapist if their experiences are causing distress.

Understand the Power of Language and How It Can Contribute to Stigma

Stigma toward mental health issues and treatment often stems from the way we come to understand concepts through pop culture and influential others. Many commonly used phrases and idioms can contribute to misunderstanding and a reluctance to seek treatment for fear of being perceived as “weak” or “crazy.” Help challenge the stigma in your corner of the world by spending some time thinking and reading about how words and experiences may feel from a different perspective.

Take Care of Yourself

One of the best ways we can contribute to improved mental health, better relationships, and healthier communities is to make sure we are managing ourselves and meeting our own needs. For people who tend to help others first, this can be feel selfish and difficult. However, it may be helpful to apply the same concept in which airline crews tell you to don your own oxygen mask before assisting others. Contact a mental health professional or treatment center if you need help with this. Some resources that may help include:

Join the Conversation

Throughout the month, you’ll likely see some hashtags related to Mental Health Awareness Month on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media platforms. It’s common for some mental health organizations to organize conversations around specific hashtags, but there are also some general ones people can use to be part of the conversation. Some we’ll be using include:

  • #MHM2017
  • #mentalhealth
  • #MentalHealthAwareness
  • #MentalHealthMatters
  • #endthestigma

Feel free to send us a message or leave a comment telling us what hashtags you’re using. We hope you’ll join us this month in raising #MentalHealthAwareness, working to #endthestigma, and prioritizing #MentalHealthMatters online and in communities around the globe.

References:

  1. Drug Overdoses Now Kill More Americans Than Guns. (2016, December 9). Retrieved from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/drug-overdose-deaths-heroin-opioid-prescription-painkillers-more-than-guns/
  2. Mental Health America. (2016). Black & African American Communities and Mental Health. Retrieved from http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/african-american-mental-health
  3. National Alliance on Mental Illness. (October 2015). Mental Health By the Numbers. Retrieved from https://www.nami.org/Learn-More/Mental-Health-By-the-Numbers
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2017, April 26). About the Epidemic. Retrieved from https://www.hhs.gov/opioids/about-the-epidemic/

© Copyright 2017 GoodTherapy.org. All rights reserved. Permission to publish granted by

  • 3 comments
  • Leave a Comment
  • claudia

    May 2nd, 2017 at 2:47 PM

    speak up and speak out

  • Alexix

    May 3rd, 2017 at 9:42 AM

    Agreed <3
    RESIST

  • Mary

    May 3rd, 2017 at 11:10 AM

    # mentalheath awareness

Leave a Comment

By commenting you acknowledge acceptance of GoodTherapy.org's Terms and Conditions of Use.

2 Z k A

 

 

* Indicates required field

Therapist   Treatment Center

Advanced Search

Search Our Blog

Title   Content   Author

Recent Comments

  • Amy: I have read so many of these posts and I am so sad that there are so many of us that are going through the same thing or...
  • Laurence: well I know that those who allow me to enjoy my coffee first will survive longer
  • Jameson: If you have teens at home like I do then you will know that there are many parents out there who see this as very welcome news! And you...
  • Sandra: I don’t think that it is necessarily wrong that you would imagine yourself with another person that you know. I guess to me this only...
  • Amy: Much more awareness and understanding of this has to be unlocked. This is not anything that will reveal itself in one or two instances; most...
GoodTherapy.org is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified mental health provider with any questions you may have regarding any mental health symptom or medical condition. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on GoodTherapy.org.