Inferiority Complex

An inferiority complex is a fundamental feeling of inadequacy due to real or imagined social, psychological, intellectual, or physical defects.

History of Inferiority Complex

Adlerian psychology differentiates between two types of inferiority complexes.

  1. Primary inferiority is experienced by children as a result of their helplessness. This inferiority can be increased when children are compared unfavorably to others, and may lead to an inferiority complex in adulthood.
  2. Secondary inferiority occurs when an adult cannot reach the goals he or she has established to cover up the feelings of inferiority he or she has left over from childhood.

Contemporary psychologists typically use the term as a catch-all for low self-esteem. People experiencing an inferiority complex may have an actual deficit that makes them feel inferior, or may imagine their inferiority.

Treatment for Inferiority Complex

Psychotherapy is highly effective at treating feelings of inferiority. Because inferiority complexes are often the result of unhealthy thought processes and false beliefs, therapists will often work with people to reframe negative and/or damaging thoughts and beliefs.

When feelings of inferiority are due to an actual deficit, such as ineffective social skills, clinicians may help a person develop these skills. However, in many cases, inferiority complexes are caused by perceived deficits. These deficits often occur when a person measures himself according to an unrealistic ideal. For example, a person who wants to look like a supermodel may experience strong feelings of inferiority, but looking like a supermodel is an unreasonable goal; even supermodels do not look like supermodels without airbrushing and expert camerawork.

People may also experience feelings of inferiority after experiencing abuse or trauma. Inferiority is associated with mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety, and clinicians may work to help people talk through their feelings of inferiority and directly address any early experiences that contributed to the development of the feelings.

References:

  1. American Psychological Association. APA concise dictionary of psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2009. Print.
  2. Colman, A. M. (2006). Oxford dictionary of psychology. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Last Updated: 08-10-2015

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  • Dave T

    Dave T

    May 10th, 2017 at 4:46 AM

    I am only 5’8″ and I wish I was talker.

  • Najar w.

    Najar w.

    May 13th, 2017 at 7:40 AM

    Im feeln the sort of depression may b d inferiority complex which i myself couldnt point out …….i lack direct eye contact…..hesitate talking to any stranger , even hesitate talking to any of my friend i had not talked for a time……. im too much depressed …… i need your help ….. rather any 1 here able to help me i will be grateful. ….Thanks

  • The GoodTherapy.org Team

    The GoodTherapy.org Team

    May 13th, 2017 at 11:16 AM

    Hi Najar,

    If you would like to consult with a mental health professional, please feel free to return to our homepage, https://www.goodtherapy.org/, and enter your zip code into the search field to find therapists in your area.

    Once you enter your information, you’ll be directed to a list of therapists and counselors who meet your criteria. From this list you can click to view our members’ full profiles and contact the therapists themselves for more information. You are also welcome to call us for assistance finding a therapist. We are in the office Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time; our phone number is 888-563-2112 ext. 1.

    Kind regards,
    The GoodTherapy.org Team

  • Cedrick

    Cedrick

    May 1st, 2019 at 7:32 AM

    I suffer from inferiority complex – please help!

  • The GoodTherapy.org Team

    The GoodTherapy.org Team

    May 1st, 2019 at 12:38 PM

    Dear Cedrick,

    If you would like to consult with a mental health professional, you can start finding therapists in your area by entering your city or ZIP code into the search field on this page: https://www.goodtherapy.org/find-therapist.html.

    Once you enter your information, you’ll be directed to a list of therapists and counselors who meet your criteria. You may click to view our members’ full profiles and contact the therapists themselves for more information. If you need help finding a therapist, you are welcome to call us. We are in the office Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time, and our phone number is 888-563-2112.

    Kind regards,
    The GoodTherapy Team

  • seth

    seth

    June 17th, 2019 at 6:28 AM

    hi I think therapy would not be affective for me as I think I’m to affected for it to work I want a list of powerful drug names I went to 9 schools have a brother 4 years older than me I’m Male I went the bed and as a teen I had anorexia so basically I’m completely screwed I need real affective medication names to knock me out of pretending to be successful and to be content alone can you recommend something

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