Trans Identities Not Caused By Hormone Imbalance, and Other News

TransgenderTransgender symbol, the combined "male" and "female" symbols youth face a world in which their identities are often pathologized and their gender expression treated as indication of a hormone imbalance or other medical issue. According to a study just published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, however, transgender identities cannot be attributed to hormone imbalances.

The study, originally designed to assess the effectiveness of hormone treatments for transgender individuals, followed 101 participants ranging in age from 12 to 24. Slightly more than half (51.5%) of participants were designated male at birth but identified as transfeminine. The remaining 48.5% were individuals who were designated female at birth and identified as transmasculine.

Various physiological measures caused researchers to realize that trans-identified youth had hormone ranges similar to those of their cisgender (non-transgender) peers. Doctors often use hormones to “treat” transgenderism, but this research suggests such treatments will be ineffective. Hormone treatments also produce a wide array of side effects.

The researchers also noted that a large number of the participants were obese or overweight. They argue this suggests that trans youth might hide unwanted physical characteristics with body fat. The average age at which participants began identifying as trans was eight, but most did not tell their families until their late teens, with an average revelation age of 17.

Colorado Rejects Medical Marijuana for PTSD Patients

A group of medical marijuana advocates have been lobbying Colorado officials to list marijuana among the group of drugs approved to treat posttraumatic stress. Marijuana is already legal in Colorado, so the move would not have changed access to the drug. Instead, the move would have allowed doctors to recommend the drug to patients with PTSD. Though some studies show that marijuana can help with PTSD, Colorado health officials say there is no enough evidence to support it as a PTSD treatment.

Why Lonely People Stay Lonely

Researchers are increasingly targeting loneliness as a predictor of many different health concerns, as evidence mounts that it can increase one’s risk of death, as well as potentially make life more difficult. According to a group of four experiments on the effects of loneliness, lonely people often panic under social pressure. One trial, for instance, found that lonely students struggled to read emotional cues, suggesting that loneliness perpetuates itself by undermining social skills.

OCD? Laser Surgery Could Provide Relief

Obsessive-compulsive behavior, which can occur as a coping method for anxiety, is sometimes resistant to traditional treatments such as therapy and medication. For those who have seen little or no benefit from these approaches, laser surgery that burns away areas of the brain damaged by the condition may offer relief. The surgery is FDA-approved only for severe cases of OCD.

Controversial Website Ashley Madison Hacked

Ashley Madison, the dating website that promises married people discreet affairs, has been hacked. The group involved, known as The Impact Team, has promised to release the identities and personal information of the site’s 37 million members if Ashley Madison does not shut down. Reports have surfaced that the group has already leaked the identity of at least one user.

Get Married in Your Late 20s if You’d Rather Not Get Divorced

While getting married early in life has been statistically proven to increase the likelihood of divorce, the odds of staying married do not increase with each passing year, according to a new analysis. Instead, the benefits of delaying marriage diminish in the late twenties and early thirties, with those who marry in their late thirties more likely to end up divorced.

Benzodiazepine Drugs Ineffective for PTSD and Trauma Treatment

Benzodiazepines, a class of anti-anxiety drugs that doctors routinely prescribe to treat various manifestations of anxiety, are ineffective at treating trauma and PTSD, a new study says. Researchers reviewed 18 studies using benzodiazepines to treat PTSD, culling data on more than 5,000 participants. They found that the drugs did not effectively treat PTSD and often led to new or worsening symptoms, including aggression, addiction, and depression.

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  • Cate

    Cate

    July 24th, 2015 at 10:10 AM

    But if pot is already legal in Colorado there is still access to it no matter your symptoms or whether your doctor says that you need it for medical reasons.

  • Carla P

    Carla P

    July 24th, 2015 at 12:38 PM

    I would want to know if my husband was on that website but finding out in that way would be brutal.

  • johnny

    johnny

    July 25th, 2015 at 11:01 AM

    I think that I will take my OCD over burning my brain any day, thanks

  • Tanner

    Tanner

    July 25th, 2015 at 6:43 PM

    Have the benzodiazepines been use to treat PTSD in the past, I mean is this normally the go to drug that will now be changing?

  • Caroline

    Caroline

    July 26th, 2015 at 9:36 AM

    I know for a fact that some people who are lonely do this to themselves. Yes there are some who may misread social cues and what not but there are others who by other things of their personalities that they are not willing to change, they bring all of this on and in some cases I think that they actually like the fact that they are alone. It is kind of like their little badge of martyr ship that they can flaunt or something.

  • Tina

    Tina

    July 27th, 2015 at 6:57 AM

    Awesome! I was 28 and my husband was 33 when we got married so we should be good to go!

  • devora

    devora

    July 27th, 2015 at 5:10 PM

    Come on Now Colorado. Are you serious? This is a legitimate medical condition and you are denying something that could truly help people out? I am kinda shocked by that. always thought they were a little more open minded and forward thinking

  • Creighton

    Creighton

    July 28th, 2015 at 3:11 PM

    I do agree that lack of social skills probably plays a huge role in the reasons why some people are lonely and they stay lonely. I don;t think that for most of them it is for lack of trying, because we ll know that it is much more pleasant to have friends around then it is to feel so alone. But you have to consider that they may have never been given the tools to develop their social skills and after a while, you stop having adults around who make their kids be friends with them. there will come a time when you have to make those friends on your own but if you have never been given the know how to do it, then as an adult, well, that leads to lonely people.

  • Morningside

    Morningside

    August 7th, 2015 at 9:07 PM

    Benzodiazepines alone may not be adequate alone for treating PTSD but combined with antidepressant it could be effective .There is no one size fits all.

  • Erin O

    Erin O

    September 1st, 2015 at 10:42 AM

    Hi, I’m a tranz girl (still hard for me to say) who was raped by this guy in my school. SUCKED!!!
    Anyway, this helped ALOT. When I was 16, I was in a really bad car accident. I’m just happy to know I would have wound up this way no matter what.

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