Supported Walking Workout Plan Helps Depressed Women

There have been many studies and proposed programs suggesting that the incorporation of exercise into one’s regular routing can go a long way towards both warding off depression and treating it in those already exhibiting symptoms. The positive effects of exercise on mental health are well-documented, but the precise ways in which physical activity can aid in the fight against depression may not always be exactly clear. It is for this reason that a study conducted at the University of Nottingham in the UK has been especially well-received. The study worked with a selection of women indicated for feelings of depression, and chose a certain number to participate in regular exercise treatment routines, while the study group was introduced to a supportive regimen of counseling and exercise.

The study was in part established based on the notion that standard gym exercise routines often fail to produce positive results for those with depression because of the relative isolation of the activity. To counteract this isolation, the study group was given extensive motivational counseling sessions before each period of physical activity, and participants took part in low-impact exercise on treadmills in communicative, supportive groups. Emotional support was on-hand throughout the exercising segments to allow for extra encouragement and help as needed.

Reporting on the experience after taking part in the counseling and exercise routines, participants noted that the personal attention and encouragement to return and continue the treatment played an important role in their success –and those participants who worked with counseling and group exercise were successful indeed, enjoying significant improvements in mood, physical health, and overall well-being. The study may help make depression-related exercise plans better tailored for those seeking new and effective treatments.

© Copyright 2009 by By Noah Rubinstein, LMFT, LMHC, therapist in Olympia, Washington. All Rights Reserved. Permission to publish granted to

The preceding article was solely written by the author named above. Any views and opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by Questions or concerns about the preceding article can be directed to the author or posted as a comment below.

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  • Elizabeth R.

    Elizabeth R.

    October 13th, 2009 at 9:18 AM

    I’m struggling with my own depression rearing its ugly head again. Thank you for the reminder to get outside and do that. It’s the last thing I feel like doing when I’m depressed but necessary. We don’t have leisure centers around here.

  • Kallis


    October 13th, 2009 at 9:54 AM

    This may be true due to dividing the attention of the person…when an individual starts working out, he pays attention to it and also follows the developments it leads to. This may help in takin his attention away from things that actually cause the depression and also exhibit him to a healthy environment.

  • Martha T.

    Martha T.

    October 16th, 2009 at 1:27 PM

    Isolation looms large in long term depression sufferers, whether voluntary or involuntary when friends and family tire of being around you. This program is an excellent idea because it brings the women together with others who understand the condition whether professionally or as a fellow sufferer. There’s a lot of ignorance out there about the depressive state of mind.

  • James


    January 23rd, 2011 at 12:35 PM

    This is a great article for anyone suffering depression. I suffer from depression and my doctor suggested I start to workout along with the other things I was doing to help with my depression. It was one of the best things I did to help with my depression. After working out for awhile I started to look better and feel better about my self. After a good workout I felt really good about my self and it would give me tons of energy to get thins done, which I never had before.



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Title   Content   Author is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified mental health provider with any questions you may have regarding any mental health symptom or medical condition. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on