Find Family Counseling in Seattle, WA

United States > Washington > Seattle > Family Counseling
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There are many factors that may contribute to the development of adverse issues within the family setting. People may choose to find a family therapist in Seattle if one or more members of the family are affected by negative behavioral, emotional, or mental health conditions. Shifts in the family dynamic may take place and the entire family unit may be affected. For example, if a husband is experiencing addiction to alcohol or illicit drugs, this may put increased pressure on his partner to care for the emotional and financial needs of the family. Children may also be affected by such circumstances - some may choose to act out in maladaptive ways (such as becoming more aggressive or defiant) while others may shut down socially. In these situations, appropriate family counseling services may help resolve the issues each family member is experiencing.

The American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) contends that family therapy techniques may be used to address a wide range of concerns within the family. Counseling may be used to address issues such as:

Education and training are key aspects of family therapy. It is often helpful for all or multiple family members to learn about the specific issues which may be affecting their household, as well as how to apply the communication, coping, and problem-solving skills they developed during family counseling sessions

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Family therapists in Seattle may work with young children who are adversely affected by negative issues within the family. In such cases, family counselors may employ age-appropriate family therapy activities which may benefit young children in treatment. While research shows that family therapy has helped many people, the approach may be less effective if treatment is discontinued too early, or if it is delivered by a person who is not qualified to offer family counseling services.

References:

  1. American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. (n.d.). About marriage and family therapists. Retrieved from http://www.aamft.org/imis15/AAMFT/Content/About_AAMFT/Qualifications.aspx
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2013). Family therapy can help. Retrieved from https://store.samhsa.gov/shin/content/SMA13-4784/SMA13-4784.pdf