x

Find the Right Therapist

Find the Right Therapist

Advanced Search | Don't show me this again.

 

Relationship Between Trauma Exposure, PTSD, and Negative Mood

 

Exposure to trauma is known to cause extreme stress. For some individuals, the trauma impacts them significantly enough to cause posttraumatic stress (PTSD). Childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse, and emotional abuse are common factors that put someone at increased risk for PTSD and other mental health problems. Mood regulation can also be negatively impacted by traumatic experience, and children who have been victimized often struggle with negative mood regulation (NMR). Adults who experience traumatic events are more vulnerable to both PTSD and NMR as well. Police officers are especially susceptible because they are exposed to traumatic situations numerous times throughout their careers. Understanding how NMR, PTSD, adult trauma exposure and childhood trauma interact with one another and predict one another can help clinicians better treat clients who suffer with these issues.

Madhur Kulkarni, of the Center for Healthcare Evaluation at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System in California, recently looked at this relationship in a sample of over 140 retired police department officers. The study revealed that the officers with the highest levels of PTSD and NMR were those that had experienced significant abuse during their childhoods. However, the findings did not show that NMR increased PTSD in abuse survivors, but instead indicated that PTSD influenced NMR in those participants. Therefore, Kulkarni believes that the findings demonstrate abuse survivors may have challenges regulating their moods as a result of the PTSD, not due to the abuse alone. Kulkarni also found that the officers with a history of childhood abuse did not have increased risk for exposure to adult trauma.

Of interest was also the discovery that NMR was only related to childhood victimization and not exposure to trauma in adulthood. This finding suggests that trauma suffered during childhood impairs a person’s ability to manage their emotional reactions, and this effect is not as evident when the traumatic exposure occurs during adulthood. Kulkarni noted that the sample of officers all had adult trauma exposure but believes that these findings still provide evidence of a unique link. Kulkarni added, “In summary, our findings potentially clarify the commonly observed relationship among childhood trauma, adult emotion dysregulation, and adult PTSD symptom severity.”

Reference:
Kulkarni, M., Pole, N., & Timko, C. (2012). Childhood victimization, negative mood regulation, and adult PTSD severity. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/a0027746

© Copyright 2012 by www.GoodTherapy.org - All Rights Reserved.

Sign up for the GoodTherapy.org Newsletter!
Get weekly mental health and wellness news and information sent straight to your inbox!

  • Find the Right Therapist
  • Join GoodTherapy.org - Therapist Only
Comments
  • Guy March 29th, 2012 at 3:38 PM #1

    Again we see this entanglement of different symptoms and manifestations of the ways that past abuses play out in ones life. I see this as further evidence that treatment for any ailment or makady, be it physical or mental, must be approached holistically rather than one by one. If you look at the whole person and the whole body it is very difficult to separate one element from another. This makes it critical for different providers to work together and create a plan that is going to address the whole being and not just their individual niche. The patients have to come to see themselves in this way too, and know that what they do for one part of the body and the mind is only very naturally going to affect the others. I know that this is a mindset and a way of thinking that most of us currently lack, but the time is now upon us to begin thinking in this manner and to create a better sense of good health and wellness within.

  • Nan March 30th, 2012 at 4:18 AM #2

    You always have to go back to the original source of the pain to pinpoint what has caused these symptoms to arise.

  • Shania March 31st, 2012 at 12:15 AM #3

    I have a friend who was abused as a child and even today she feels jittery at times when she observes something that connects her to those dreadful memories..It’s like the childhood abuse has taken shelter in her mind and certain things can trigger a small relapse..Can she get help?

  • Nicole Kozminuk March 31st, 2012 at 8:28 PM #4

    [TRAUMA 1]

    WHEN I WAS 7, during a period of time in which I was NOT PERMITTED TO GO HOME (by my mother, for my safety) MY BELOVED CAT, TOBY, WAS BRUTALLY MURDERED….

    [TRAUMA 2]

    WHEN I WAS 9, I was told that I was going on a vacation, then NOT PERMITTED TO RETURN TO MY HOME. The result of this being the UNEXPECTED LOSS OF ANOTHER BELOVED CAT, GEORGE, this time not to murder, but still I never got to see him ever again. I was absolutely devastated….

    [TRAUMA 3]

    IN 2009 AT THE AGE OF 30, I was falsely imprisoned; at the end of a 72 hour hold; in a mental health facility (following a self-aborted suicide attempt) for the sole purpose of the facilities profit.(I have an extensive amount of direct-evidence proving my assertion to be fact)…. Realizing my greatest fear in life;once again,UNEXPECTEDLY NOT BEING PERMITTED TO RETURN TO MY HOME AND CATS, CAUSED A FLASH BACK OF “TRAUMA 2″….

    [TRAUMA 4]

    After the Consent and Capacity board set me free, 11 days later, I discovered that one of my cats had not been receiving her meds as I explained to my parents that they were to be administered. As the medicine was an antibiotic, the bacteria had gained so much strength that MY YOUNGER CAT, KALISE, WOULD HAVE ALMOST CERTAINLY DIED WITHIN A FEW DAYS HAD I NOT BEEN ABLE TO RETURN HOME (I had to force feed/water her for weeks, then slowly coach her into being willing to eat for herself again bit by bit –the condition she had antibiotics for was oral. Her full recovery took months!…..

    [RESULTS OF TRAUMA]

    My previously self-manageable inability to tolerate spacial separations from the secure base of my home was substantially more intense. I lost my earnings capacity because of this…. (How can someone seek out help to heal from abuse they suffered, when the very people who are supposed to be there to help, are that victim’s abusers?….)

    [CURRENTLY]

    I filed a lawsuit against those involved in my False Imprisonment (I am acting as my own attorney as I couldn’t find one to represent me on a pay-when-we-win-basis.) I AM IN DESPARATE NEED OF A PSYCHIATRIST WHO WOULD BE WILLING TO DONATE A FEW HOURS OF HIS/HER TIME TO REVIEW MY HEALTH RECORDS, AND LAWSUIT WITH IT’S EXTENSIVE AMOUNT OF DIRECT-EVIDENCE PROVING MY ASSERTIONS TO BE FACT, TO COUNTER THE DEFENSES EXPERT WITNESS’ TESTIMONY.

    IF YOU ARE A WILLING PSYCHIATRIST -OR- IF YOU CAN REFER ME TO ONE, PLEASE reply to this post. .

    Thank you for taking the time to read this….
    -Nicole.

  • Georgia April 1st, 2012 at 11:32 AM #5

    Oh gosh, it is always the same, one bad thing always breeds another, they feed off of each other until you are not sure where one ends and the next horror begins. There are things that are too awful to get past, so the mind tries to protect you but you know that via PTSD and other mental disorders the bad stuff is always out there lurking, looking to sneak into your awakened psyche once again.

Leave a Reply

By commenting you acknowledge acceptance of GoodTherapy.org's Terms and Conditions of Use.

 

 

* = Required fields

Find the Right Therapist

Advanced Search | Browse Locations

Content Author Title

Recent Comments

  • Debra E.: I am unable to become invested in any real relationship, both friend or romantic. Out of sight, out of mind. Childhood abuse, my long...
  • hopeless: My ex always says I don’t communicate when it’s vise versa. He takes the children without me saying bye to them. He portrays...
  • denise: just wanted to say I experienced the samething and I am now 31 years old feeling the way you are battling severe depression and anxiety I...
  • Maisy: My husband was actually the one who suggested that we go for marital counseling and luckily I agreed with him. It has made talking so much...
  • Cord: I am not really sure that my wife even wats to acknowledge the fact that I had an affair and she sure doesn’t want to know the reasons...