High-Fat, Low-Carbohydrate Diet Improves Autism Symptoms in Mice

Ketogenic diets (KD) consist of foods that are high in fat and low in carbohydrates. They have become extremely popular in recent decades for weight loss and blood sugar regulation. Despite the fact that they are highly debated within medical communities, the KD has been shown to help reduce seizures in epilepsy. By metabolizing ketones rather than blood glucose, the overall result is increased ketones, decreased blood sugar, and enhanced mitochondrial activity and functioning. These processes work together to decrease seizures in both adults and children. However, how the KD can affect other neurological and psychological conditions is less clear.

Autism spectrum (ASD) issues are on the increase and cause difficulties with social interactions and communication. Another hallmark symptom of ASD is that of repetitive behaviors. Many children with ASD also have seizures, and these children are especially vulnerable to negative outcomes and treatment resistance.

Therefore, David N. Ruskin of the Neuroscience Program at Trinity College in Connecticut wanted to see if a KD could reduce seizure activity and ASD symptoms. In a recent study, Ruskin tested his theory on BTBR mice, which have been shown to have high social deficits and ASD type behaviors. Ruskin fed the mice a KD or standard diet for three weeks and evaluated their levels of sociability, repetitive behaviors, and communicative interaction with the other mice. He also conducted testing to determine if the mice had seizure activity and if the KD decreased that activity.

Ruskin found that although seizures were rare in the mice, the other ASD behaviors were high. The mice that received the KD exhibited significant decreases in repetitive behaviors and had marked increases in sociability and communication. The lack of seizure activity suggests that the KD can help improve ASD type behaviors regardless of whether or not it impacts seizures. This is especially relevant as not all children or adults with ASD have seizure activity. Ruskin added, “Therefore, ketogenic diets or analogous metabolic strategies may offer novel opportunities to improve core behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.”

Reference:
Ruskin, D.N., Svedova, J., Cote, J.L., Sandau, U., Rho, J.M., et al. (2013). Ketogenic diet improves core symptoms of autism in BTBR mice. PLoS ONE 8(6): e65021. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065021

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The preceding article summarizes research or news from periodicals or related source material in the fields of mental health and psychology. GoodTherapy.org did not participate in or condone any studies, or conclucions thereof, that may have been cited. Any views or opinions expressed are not necessarily shared by GoodTherapy.org.

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  • Nathan

    June 18th, 2013 at 4:17 AM

    Atkins for autism? I have heard stranger things.

  • Cate

    June 18th, 2013 at 10:54 AM

    I just recently finished reading a book that seriously advocates for a gluten free diet and the startling findings that this doctor had with many of his patients once they swore off the wheat. He made mention of cardio improvements as well as with the symptoms of diabetes and other metabolic diseases. If I remember correctly he also talked about how there have been many autistic patients and families who have witnessed dramatic gains in abilities once the child is given a new diet that is totally gluten free. Could diet really be the answer that we have been looking for, noy just for answers to this particular disorder but for so many others as well?

  • leila

    June 19th, 2013 at 4:22 AM

    have to be careful here
    what might work for a mouse
    is not always going to work for a human

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